Young Minds Helped Mango Rebrand

How young people can help your team’s digital marketing strategy.

Young people are a real asset to any company’s outlook. Not only is it great for CSR, it can be a genuine pleasure to understand their experience in the modern world. It is also a really valuable opportunity for all kinds of young people to get an experience of business beyond what they’ve seen on TV. Making business accessible to young people is an asset to a companies’ longevity and legacy.

Daniel Levan-Harris stated that the biggest problem for young people these days is learning how to counter negative stereotypes concerning youth culture: stuck on their phones, head in the clouds with no innovative thoughts. By getting young people on site, you will find that they’re far more than that, as we have recently found by involving a group of teenagers in our new website launch. I mean, who is more digitally in tune than a generation of people who have grown up with the internet at their fingertips? Whilst teens and logistics seem to be opposing ideas, the digital world is what bridges the gap between these seemingly different things.

A brainstorming session with our work experience student and intern brought forth some really interesting ideas which have gone on to shape the look of our new company website – hopefully making logistics cool again. Trying out new methods of idea scouting is always worth it. If you choose to work with young people, these are some tips which we have put together for getting the most out of your young people during work experience.

  • You have to know what you are talking about before getting in a room with young people, be very prepared. You will be the one directing them after all. Remember: the student is only as good as the teacher lets them be. They will be ready to challenge you and your ideas, you need to be ready to extend them just as well.
  • Make sure you explain clearly what is expected of them, the end goal you want to achieve and some insights into how you want them to achieve it. Don’t be scared to repeat things, it doesn’t undermine your authority to make yourself clear. Give them a clear deadline to keep them focussed, but don’t plan their every waking moment. Allowing young people autonomy is what reminds them that they’re at work, not school.
  • This being said, at some point they will realise they need to prioritise, which you should help them do. Sit down with them to set some goals so that they have something to review at key points. Like London weather, the forecast will be inevitably wrong – that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t at least try to get it as best you can.
  • Once they understand the task at hand and how to complete it, encourage them to brainstorm their ideas out loud. Perhaps on a white board or post-it wall so that they can track their thoughts across a day, or the week. This encourages autonomy also, as they will be able to look back on their work if they get stuck without constant assistance.
  • Keep daily meetings at the start of the day to make sure they have established what they are doing for the day and at the end of the day to see what they have achieved. This lets you make sure they haven’t been too idle, without seeming as if you’re checking up on them. Make sure you redirect them each time they are wondering off track or give them some additional insight on things they might have forgotten to consider. This is the time for you to ask each other any questions you might have to make sure everything is clear and gain as much insight into each other’s work as possible.

Give them the freedom to try out new things and even if it takes time for them to understand the job very well, give them a chance. We were all them once, and given enough patience and time they could be capable of great things.

Young minds have a very creative insight on life and as they are outsiders to your industry they will look at it with brand new eyes and if you give them enough freedom, they might come up with great ideas

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

Benjamin Franklin

“To know how to suggest is the art of teaching.”

Henri-Frédéric Amiel

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